10 Tips for Starting a Consulting Business

Money DetailsAre you thinking of starting a consulting business? Let’s say consulting, engineering, graphic design, SEO or marketing help, something you can do yourself? Here are some tips I’ve garnished from several decades of it. I took my business from high-end professional service to software products, but I’ve never stopped watching the service businesses, and I’m actively involved in several. My favorite, at the moment, is Have Presence, which does social media posting for business owners.

Here are those 10 tips:

  1. Find a focus. Be different from anybody offering similar services to similar clients, in a way they can understand immediately and will share with others. Example: Have Presence isn’t a social media strategy firm that advises you; it’s a do-the-work business that does the posting every day for business owners who don’t have time to do it themselves.
  2. Set your goals right and define success well. Service businesses generally take less start-up capital but are also much less likely than product businesses to offer eventual leverage and scalability. There are exceptions, but in most service businesses the assets walk out the door every night. Those businesses are relatively easy to start, relatively easy to survive and prosper with, but also hard to grow beyond small, hard to sell, and hard to attract outside investors.
  3. Look for a business anchor. That’s a former employer and/or a strong client.  For example, before I left a salary position and went on my own, I had Apple Computer, a former client, and Creative Strategies, a former employer, both willing to contract my services from the beginning. Apple remained critical to – and loyal to – my business services from the beginning in 1984 until Business Plan Pro changed the business to product-driven in 1994.
  4. Understand your first client is twice as hard to get as your second. And the second is a third harder than the third. Land those first few clients well. Make sure they’re happy. Give them a huge discount to get the relationship going, and expect to keep your rates low for them, but ask them, in return, to not tell strangers what they pay you. Work free if you have to. You need references and testimonials.
  5. Use social media and content marketing. Create and share content that validates your expertise. Your marketing today is so much easier than it was when I went out on my own; where I had to get through editors and publishers and conference organizers to get my expertise in front of clients (specifically, I wrote magazine articles, and books, and I spoke at conferences), you can do it yourself by posting on blogs and Twitter and Facebook and LinkedIn. And don’t
  6. Spend wisely on your logo and look and feel. Look into 99Designs, I’ve seen some sensational work from them. A professional look to your logo and website (or Twitter or Facebook or LinkedIn profile, if that’s all you do for a website) is really important. It isn’t a matter of business cards or stationery anymore, but it is how you represent yourself.
  7. Don’t ever spend money you don’t have. You’ll get lots of suggestions for ways you can spend money now to make money later; mail lists, marketing programs, they never stop.
  8. Don’t ever lose a client. Repeat business is vital. Keeping your existing clients is way cheaper and easier than finding new ones. Always go that extra mile, when you have to, to keep your existing clients happy.
  9. Know your numbers. If you don’t know the difference between sales and money in the bank, between profits and cash, learn it. It’s vital. Know your numbers like the back of your hand.
  10. Never compromise integrity. You’re going to succeed or fail based on your reputation. Don’t cut corners with credibility.
  11. (Bonus point) Expect to make mistakes. If you can’t acknowledge and learn from and apologize for your mistakes, then you’re doomed. You will make them. If you think you won’t, keep your day job.
  12. (Second bonus point) Do your own simple, practical business plan. Do it for yourself, not outsiders. Make it just big enough. Keep it fluid and flexible and review it often and revise it frequently. Read Lean Business Planning, by me. Sign up for www.liveplan.com. [Disclosure: I’m the author of that book (but I’m linking you to where you can read it free) and I own Palo Alto Software, which publishes liveplan, a web app for business planning.]

Comments

  • Thank you for this informative site. I’m just beginning to frame my consulting business and your site has been one of the best I’ve encountered. I plan to launch a consulting business focusing on document preparation, specifically government forms- federal, state, other (unemployment benefits, taxes, social security disability, immigration, student aid). I am wondering if this is too broad of an approach, should I focus on a specific area, like life planner who aids students embarking on higher education plans? Assisting them with federal financial aid, scholarship applications, university applications…I don’t want to focus on testing aid so much, but I could do document prep for act/sat and lsat/gmat and provide resources for students to use when considering which area of education to pursue. Or should I focus on unemployment benefits applications and general document preparation? Is that too broad ? I am not sure of immigration as it may involve special requirements to assist people. I do want to focus on helping Spanish speaking citizens navigate US federal forms. I will advertise at high schools and construction placement companies, etc…do you think this is viable? Any tips or pointers? Thanks,

    Jeremy Yeager

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