Planning, Startups, Stories


Tim Berry on business planning, starting and growing your business, and having a life in the meantime.

Truth: Politicians and Small Business

Once again we have elections and the useless self-serving rhetoric of politicians and small business. talk about Damn, elections are heating up again. All politicians claim to speak for “small business.” As if anybody could speak for small business, given that just about the only thing business owners have in common with each other is that we have nothing in common with each other. And all candidates promise to create jobs, or to bring them back to the U.S. from other countries.

Do politicians create jobs?

Ask yourself: How does a president create jobs? How does a senator create jobs? How does congress create jobs? Think for a second about startups, entrepreneurship, and small business. Tax rates, safety rules, employee law, and of course health care affect existing small business, yes. But startup founders don’t look at tax rates and health care costs before starting – they look at the market, what they want to do, the team, the feasibility, and so forth.

So every politician claims to support small business. Have you ever heard one say no to that? Is it anything different from the American flag, apple pie, and motherhood? Damn!

And what does that mean?  They pause just a second, and then go straight into how supporting small business means voting for them. Every candidate speaks for the supposed little guy. Right? And every candidate promises to create jobs.

What bugs me a lot about politics and small business, particularly around election time, is how many people claim to speak for small business when, in fact, really, nobody does. And the numbers they spout, along with the self righteousness of it all.

What politician really speaks for small business?

Business owners don’t fit into categories and generalizations. We are as unlike, one from the other, as any other random group of people pulled together for the common factor of owning a business. We don’t have the same opinions, and we don’t need or want the same things.

Think about what we have in common: jumping off the path, maybe, doing things differently, doing our own wheels instead of being cogs in bigger wheels. Does it make sense to assume we’re all in favor of one thing or the other? I don’t think so.

And politicians don’t create jobs. People create jobs.

(Image credit: The flag, apple pie, and motherhood. From Truback, Mindstorm, and Boris Ryaposov, respectively, on Shutterstock)

It's election time again so we have the four-year romance of politicians and small business. What actually creates jobs is not what the politicians say.