Planning, Startups, Stories


Tim Berry on business planning, starting and growing your business, and having a life in the meantime.

Is It Stupid to Ask for a Better Email Address? 2

He asked me about my business plan review, something I like doing, and that I charge for. I should be happy, right? And forthcoming?

bigstock paranoia boy in tin hat

But his email address is three letters having nothing to do with his name, plus three numbers, at yahoo.com (like nnn###@yahoo.com). So I asked him, before sending a work sample, to give me a better email address or identify himself better.

Am I off base? Is that stupid? Like blowing off a potential client?

On one hand, maybe this person just doesn’t want to use real email because he (or she) doesn’t want me to spam back. I get that. Nobody I know likes to give an email address to the wrong person.

On the other hand, from my side, it feels like I’m corresponding with, even sending information to, somebody who has a generic name and generic email address, a complete throwaway address. There’s no web footprint at all.

What do you think?

And too bad, too. Right? That it’s dumb to just trust? And who trusts first: Him (or her) or me?

  • http://saleskick.me Jim Logan

    I think it’s completely reasonable to expect and ask for a legitimate email address. I’ve done the same, asking someone to identify themselves before I engage with them. Basic identification is the lowest form of legitimacy. If someone won’t share their name and business, I won’t give them a minute’s worth of consideration.

  • inger

    It is completely valid. You either want to see a name that matches that of Tue owner or business. Otherwise it may seem like a scam business. Things have got to look professional.