Planning, Startups, Stories


Tim Berry on business planning, starting and growing your business, and having a life in the meantime.

My Business Planning Tutorials as Online Video on SBA.GOV site 2

I’m proud that my online video tutorials on business planning are now posted on the community.sba.gov site where they are available to all, and fee, and I do hope useful.  Here’s the list. You can take them one at a time — about 5-10 minutes each — in the original order, or pick and choose.

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  1. Introduction and orientation (2:12)
  2. Planning is modular (1:26) Think of the plan as a collection of connected blocks. Start anywhere. Get going.
  3. Form follows function (4:45) How big, what format, what’s included, what platform … it all depends on the specific business use of this plan. Most of them stay loosely connected on a network. Only a minority need to be edited, polished, and printed onto paper.
  4. Planning is management (1:20)  Planning should become management and better business, long-term progress towards goals, prioritizing, and focus; but you have to do it. It’s up to you to make your planning work. It’s not really about the plan, per se; it’s about the discipline to use the plan to run the business.
  5. Planning your strategy (8:04) Strategy is the heart of the plan, which is also the heart of the business. It is made up of a group of three core concepts that can’t be separated: market, identity, and focus. Don’t pull them apart. It’s the interrelationship between them that drives your business.
  6. Business plan flesh and bones (10:25) I like to think of defining flesh and bones as setting the steps. You have a strategy, you’ve got the heart of your business settled, but you want to set it down into concrete steps you can follow and track.
  7. Sales forecast (3 videos, 4:51, 3:10, and 9:27) Your sales forecast is the backbone of your business plan. People measure a business and its growth by sales, and your sales forecast sets the standard for expenses, profits and growth. The sales forecast is almost always going to be the first set of numbers you’ll track for plan vs. actual use. This is what you’ll do even if you do no other numbers.
  8. Dress and grow your plan (12:15)  As your company grows, your planning grows. As you grow, if you add people to your team, then you want to bring them into the process, and make sure you’re on the same page. You bring in skills. The business gets more complex as it grows. Cash flow gets more sophisticated. You start to manage the money and administration differently.
  9. The formal business plan document (3 videos, 5:39, 8:48, 2:26) You don’t necessarily need to have a standard, traditional, formal business plan. Until you really need to show a plan to some outsider who needs, wants, or expects the full formal plan, you can just use your plan-as-you-go plan to reap the benefits and avoid the hassle of the document. However, there are business reasons that force you to produce the traditional plan document. We call these business plan events. The more common business plan events are related to seeking loans or investments. Ironically, the bank loan manager, angel investor, or venture capitalist may not read your plan, but most of them want to know you have one, which means they want it to appear in their inbox or on their desk.

For better or worse, aside from these there are a lot of older tutorials with me talking, and me narrating slides, on YouTube and elsewhere. These were done more recently. They are based on my plan-as-you-go idea for the next generation of business plan, which is the first step in business planning. Planning is about results, lean, agile, flexible, and intended to manage change. It’s the planning, not the plan, that matters. And the plan — what’s going to happen, when, who’s responsible, how much, dates, deadlines, etc. — that matters, not the document.

I hope you find these tutorials useful.

  • http://timberry.com Tim Berry

    Thanks for that Jan, from my side, the work is done, the more useful to more people, the better. :) Tim

  • http://www.educationtrainingsolutions.com Jan Schwartz

    This is excellent, Tim! Thanks so much for your generous sharing. This will be a great resource for my career school students.